Go-To x Lynette Nangala Singleton

Each year, Go-To features the work of an Australian artist in our holiday campaign. In 2020, we wanted to celebrate — and collaborate with — our First Nations people and we are thrilled to feature an original artwork by Lynette Nangala Singleton titled, “Ngapa Jukurrpa.”

Go-To is honoured to showcase an original artwork by Lynette Nangala Singleton titled, “Ngapa Jukurrpa.”

Lynette Nangala
@Lynette Nangala Singleton

Meet Lynette

Lynette Nangala Singleton is an artist from Nyirripi Community, located roughly 450kms North West of Alice Springs. She has been painting with Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation, an Aboriginal owned and governed art centre located in Yuendumu, since 2008. She paints her Father’s Jukurrpa stories, Dreamings, which relate directly to her land, in particular a rock hole west of Lake McKay. These stories have been passed down by her father and her father’s father for millennia.

Go-To is honoured to showcase an original artwork by Lynette Nangala Singleton titled, “Ngapa Jukurrpa.”

All About The Artwork

Ngapa Jukurrpa (Water Dreaming) — Puyurru.

The site depicted in this painting is Puyurru, west of Yuendumu. In the usually dry creek beds are ‘mulju’ (soakages), or naturally occurring wells. The 'kirda' (owners) for this site are Nangala/Nampijinpa women and Jangala/Jampijinpa men. Two Jangala men, rainmakers, sang the rain, unleashing a giant storm. The storm travelled across the country from the east to the west, initially travelling with a ‘pamapardu Jukurrpa’ (termite Dreaming) from Warntungurru to Warlura, a waterhole 8 miles east of Yuendumu. At Warlura, a gecko called Yumariyumari blew the storm on to Lapurrukurra and Wilpiri. Bolts of lightning shot out at Wirnpa (also called Mardinymardinypa) and at Kanaralji. At this point the Dreaming track also includes the ‘kurdukurdu mangkurdu Jukurrpa’ (children of the clouds Dreaming). The water Dreaming built hills at Ngamangama using baby clouds and also stuck long pointy clouds into the ground at Jukajuka, where they can still be seen today as rock formations.

Lynette uses traditional iconography to represent the Jukurrpa, associated sites, and other elements.

In many paintings of this Jukurrpa, curved and straight lines represent the 'ngawarra' (flood waters) running through the landscape. Motifs frequently used to depict this story include small circles representing 'mulju' (water soakages) and short bars depicting 'mangkurdu' (cumulus & stratocumulus clouds).

Doin’ Our Bit

We will be donating $1 from all boxed Go-To festive sets to Children's Ground, an organisation led by Aboriginal communities, dedicated to changing the future for the next generation of First Nations children. Their vision is a world where all children and families live with dignity and are free from economic poverty and inequity. We believe in community and we believe in helping out, and we’re fortunate enough to be able to, so of course we will.

@childrensground
Go-To is delighted to support Children’s Ground.
Go-To is delighted to support Children’s Ground.

Go-To is honoured to showcase an original artwork by Lynette Nangala Singleton titled, “Ngapa Jukurrpa.”

All About The Artwork

Ngapa Jukurrpa (Water Dreaming) — Puyurru.

The site depicted in this painting is Puyurru, west of Yuendumu. In the usually dry creek beds are ‘mulju’ (soakages), or naturally occurring wells. The 'kirda' (owners) for this site are Nangala/Nampijinpa women and Jangala/Jampijinpa men. Two Jangala men, rainmakers, sang the rain, unleashing a giant storm. The storm travelled across the country from the east to the west, initially travelling with a ‘pamapardu Jukurrpa’ (termite Dreaming) from Warntungurru to Warlura, a waterhole 8 miles east of Yuendumu. At Warlura, a gecko called Yumariyumari blew the storm on to Lapurrukurra and Wilpiri. Bolts of lightning shot out at Wirnpa (also called Mardinymardinypa) and at Kanaralji. At this point the Dreaming track also includes the ‘kurdukurdu mangkurdu Jukurrpa’ (children of the clouds Dreaming). The water Dreaming built hills at Ngamangama using baby clouds and also stuck long pointy clouds into the ground at Jukajuka, where they can still be seen today as rock formations.

Lynette uses traditional iconography to represent the Jukurrpa, associated sites, and other elements.

In many paintings of this Jukurrpa, curved and straight lines represent the 'ngawarra' (flood waters) running through the landscape. Motifs frequently used to depict this story include small circles representing 'mulju' (water soakages) and short bars depicting 'mangkurdu' (cumulus & stratocumulus clouds).

Doin’ Our Bit

We will be donating $1 from all boxed Go-To festive sets to Children's Ground, an organisation led by Aboriginal communities, dedicated to changing the future for the next generation of First Nations children. Their vision is a world where all children and families live with dignity and are free from economic poverty and inequity. We believe in community and we believe in helping out, and we’re fortunate enough to be able to, so of course we will.

@childrensground
Go-To is delighted to support Children’s Ground.
Go-To is delighted to support Children’s Ground.